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Positron and Electron

Submitted by Chatman on Fri, 03/19/2010 - 21:05

Hey how do i know which particle (Electron/Positron) is emitted during beta decay.


It could be either electron or positron depending whether it is beta plus or beta minus decay.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beta_decay

In β− decay, the weak interaction converts a neutron (n) into a proton (p) while emitting an electron (e−) and an electron antineutrino (νe):
n → p + e− + νe

In β+ decay, energy is used to convert a proton into a neutron, a positron (e+) and a neutrino (νe):
energy + p → n + e+ + νe

So, unlike β−, β+ decay cannot occur in isolation, because it requires energy, the mass of the neutron being greater than the mass of the proton. β+ decay can ONLY happen inside nuclei when the value of the binding energy of the mother nucleus is less than that of the daughter nucleus. The difference between these energies goes into the reaction of converting a proton into a neutron, a positron and a neutrino and into the kinetic energy of these particles.


well which is more comman β+  or β−


Chatman wrote:

well which is more comman β+  or β−

I think the decay emitting electron is more common, ie we don't produce anti-particle that easily.


Well what is the anti particle made of.


Chatman wrote:

Well what is the anti particle made of.

Well we used to think that the electrons, protons and neutrons are the smallest sub-atomic particles, but it turns out that particle physicist had discovered many years ago that:
1) the proton and the neutron are baryons and thus made of 3 quarks
2) electrons are leptons, etc

etc because i am more into chemistry than particle physics, LOL. Maybe you can read more on the antiparticle site on wikipedia, or read up texts on  these antiparticles, apparently, CERN in france/switzerland is doing a lot of research on finding more and more of these new sub-atomic particles, ie they CREATE it in labs.

Sorry, can't help anymore than this.