organic compounds

What is the name of ( 5-chloro hexanol-3 ) according to the common system?  

According to rules i think it should be ( 5-chloro secondary hexyl alcohol ) , but it looks a little bit strange !! and i think it's wrong .. it's really confusing :( 

I hope to know what is the right way to name it according to the common system? 

Thank you

You asked according to the common name so the common name is a historical name rather than the more systematic IUPAC name.

For the systematic name you have an alkane that has a chloro and an alcohol substituent.  It is an arbitrary convention that it is named as an alcohol as more priority than name as a haloalkane.  So it is named as an alcohol with a chloro subsituent.  I think it would be 5-chloro-3-hexanol.  More recently it would be 5-chlorohexan-3-ol which puts the 3 closer to what it refers to 'ol' meaning alcohol.

For the common names it is named as what alkyl group is on the alcohol.  That is it is the common name of whatever alkyl group on the -OH.  So for now skip the chloro group and what is the common name of 3-hexanol?  sec-hexanol is not specific enough because there could be secondary alcohol on either the 2 or the 3 position.  In the 4 or 5 position it would also be secondary but they wouldn't exist because you could start numbering at either end of the chain so 5 would be same as 2 and 3 would be same as 4.  Do you follow so far?

So when you have the chloro now it is even less specific just say 'sec' or 'secondary' because now for a 5-chloro substituted alcohol now 2, 3, and 4 are all secondary alcohols.  And if the carbon with the chloro group is substituted with both chloro and alcohol then I don't think there is a common name for such a pattern and it is definitely not a regular 'sec' alcohol.

So we have seen that just giving 5-chloro 'sec' alcohol it is not specific enough to know what the connectivity is as the alcohol group could be on the 4, 3, or 2 carbon atom.  I don't know what the common name is but this would be a molecule easy to name by the IUPAC 5-chloro-3-hexanol so why not just use that?

THANK YOU VERY MUCH for your answer...  I really benefited from it.. 

I've understood why just saying 'sec' is not specific or enough to know what the connectivity is.

It became more difficult to know what the common name is , but I'm very eager and excited to know the answer .You're right it's much easier to name it by the IUPAC . 

Thanks again

 

I think mostly the reason to learn common names is to read literature or listen to lectures where they are using those common names.  So you only need to learn the ones that are commonly used.  Not every molecule has a common name though.  I don't know the common name of the 5 chloro 3 hexanol and there might not be one, but I'm glad my answer earlier was helpful.  

Aha........ It's the first time to know that not every molecule has a common name.. 

Anyway , it's not that much important to know what's it's common name ,  I was just curiuos about it. Thanks

 

It's the first time to know that not every molecule has a common name .

Anyway , it's not that much important to know what's it's common name , I was just curiuos about it. Thanks

Only some molecules (generally smaller) have popular common names .